The Latest

Mar 18, 2014 / 1 note

Amazing tease….

dandydarling:

Dreams.
Mar 12, 2014 / 7,482 notes

dandydarling:

Dreams.

Mar 3, 2014 / 26,381 notes
Feb 25, 2014 / 2,971 notes

blackfashion:

Josilyn Williams, Riley Montana, Senait Gidey, Grace Mahary, Maria Borges, Jessica Strother and Sherita Dehon covers the March 2014 issue of Numero Magazine photographed by Sebastian Kim and styled by Charles Varenne with hair and makeup by Diego Da Silva & Fredrik Stambro.

hybridchic:

Maya of the @TheMCBProject featured my work in her “Frame of Mind Project,” and was spot on with my love of pastels, metallic gold and midcentury modern design [the Linden Floor lamp gives of a midcentury vibe]. I am actually in the process of reupholstery a great vintage find in a pastel pink—get out of my head girl! Of course I am adding some neon to the color scheme too.
Check out the post here
Feb 20, 2014 / 1 note

hybridchic:

Maya of the @TheMCBProject featured my work in her “Frame of Mind Project,” and was spot on with my love of pastels, metallic gold and midcentury modern design [the Linden Floor lamp gives of a midcentury vibe]. I am actually in the process of reupholstery a great vintage find in a pastel pink—get out of my head girl! Of course I am adding some neon to the color scheme too.

Check out the post here

Feb 20, 2014 / 255 notes

kingtexas:

Stas + Cat (Thee Satisfaction) *  B L A C K N E S S * . Brooklyn, NY (Kale Kastle) . 2013

michaelaangelad:

Day 9     #50DaysTo50
shawty
shawty slim
hey, red   (take time in-between these words)     bone
dats DC talk
in DC for a talk
it’s February so you know we be talking
we be talking 
i am from here though
DC helped create me
constructed some of my layers
I was made aware of my connectedness and my otherness
here
i was black and I was light 
i was black and creative and intellectual and black
and I had people and people had me
i made friends ever lasting 
i learned how to dream my own kind of blackness here
it was a privilege a blessing not a burden
to be young gifted and black
i was trained to know I was a gift and gifted
here in DC
i could be baad ass and funky and into fashion and hardcore 
and love Phyllis Hyman and the Quiet Storm and the 930 Club
some where in my life time…..with the quickness 
i was allowed
with all my complexities contradictions and layers
pickles and pumpkin seeds 
i have levels and layers
layers built by chocolate city


pcitured: me’shell n’degeocello another sister made of chocolate city layers..she was a go go rock star shot in chelsea piers when it was still a hanger by Ruven Afanador (of course)
Feb 19, 2014 / 8 notes

michaelaangelad:

Day 9     #50DaysTo50

shawty

shawty slim

hey, red   (take time in-between these words)     bone

dats DC talk

in DC for a talk

it’s February so you know we be talking

we be talking 

i am from here though

DC helped create me

constructed some of my layers

I was made aware of my connectedness and my otherness

here

i was black and I was light 

i was black and creative and intellectual and black

and I had people and people had me

i made friends ever lasting 

i learned how to dream my own kind of blackness here

it was a privilege a blessing not a burden

to be young gifted and black

i was trained to know I was a gift and gifted

here in DC

i could be baad ass and funky and into fashion and hardcore 

and love Phyllis Hyman and the Quiet Storm and the 930 Club

some where in my life time…..with the quickness 

i was allowed

with all my complexities contradictions and layers

pickles and pumpkin seeds 

i have levels and layers

layers built by chocolate city

pcitured: me’shell n’degeocello another sister made of chocolate city layers..she was a go go rock star shot in chelsea piers when it was still a hanger by Ruven Afanador (of course)

Jan 16, 2014 / 3 notes

Inspiration for new posters

#power

Jan 14, 2014

What Difference Does it Make? 

Red Bull Academy’s film about Making Music.

… The power of cinema is an uncontainable thing and it’s truly remarkable, in its capacity for emotional evolution. When I was first watching the world of cinema, there was a film that stunned the world, with all its aspects and art form. They did a lot, at that time. The film was done by D.W. Griffith, and it was called The Birth of a Nation, and it talked about America’s story, its identity, and its place in the universe of nations. And that film depicted the struggles of this country with passion and power and great human abuse. Its depiction of black people was carried with great cruelty. And the power of cinema styled this nation, after the release of the film, to riot and to pillage and to burn and to murder black citizens. The power of film.
At the age of five, in 1932, I had the great thrill of going to the cinema. It was a great relief for those of us who were born into poverty, a way we tried to get away from the misery. One of the films they made for us, the first film I saw, was Tarzan of the Apes. [Ed note: The movie is called Tarzan the Ape Man.] In that film, [we] looked to see the human beauty of Johnny Weissmuller swinging through the trees, jump off, and there spring to life, while the rest were depicted as grossly subhuman, who were ignorant, who did not know their way around the elements, living in forests with wild animals. Not until Johnny Weissmuller stepped into a scene did we know who we were, according to cinema.

Throughout the rest of my life … on my birth certificate, it said “colored.” Not long after that, I became “Negro.” Not too long after that, I became “black.” Most recently, I am now “African-American.” I spent the better part of almost a century just in search of, seeking, “Who am I? What am I? What am I to be called? What do I say? Who do I appeal to? Who should I be cautious of?” In this life, when we walk into the world of cinema, we use the instrument that is our ability to try to give another impression of who and what we were as a people, and what we meant to this great nation called America. I’m glad that Sidney Poitier should step into this space right after the Second World War, and new images of what we are as people, certainly as men.
A lot’s gone on with Hollywood. A lot could be said about it. But at this moment, I think what is redeeming, what is transformative, is the fact that a genius, an artist, is of African descent, although he’s not from America, he is of America, and he is of that America which is part of his own heritage; [he] made a film called 12 Years a Slave, which is stunning in the most emperial way. So it’s a stage that enters a charge made by The Birth of a Nation, that we were not a people, we were evil, rapists, abusers, absent of intelligence, absent of soul, heart, inside. In this film, 12 Years a Slave, Steve steps in and shows us, in an overt way, that the depth and power of cinema is there for now the world to see us in another way. I was five when I saw Tarzan of the Apes, and the one thing I never wanted to be, after seeing that film, was an African. I didn’t want to be associated with anybody that could have been depicted as so useless and meaningless. And yet, life in New York led me to other horizons, other experiences. And now I can say, in my 87th year of life, that I am joyed, I am overjoyed, that I should have lived long enough to see Steve McQueen step into this space and for the first time in the history of cinema, give us a work, a film, that touches the depths of who we are as a people, touches the depths of what America is as a country, and gives us a sense of understanding more deeply what our past has been, how glorious our future will be, and could be.

I think that the Circle Award made a wise decision picking you as the director of the year. I think we look forward in anticipation to what you do in the future. But even if you never do anything else, many in your tribe, many in the world, are deeply grateful of the time and genius it took to show us a way that it should be. Forever and eternally grateful to say that we are of African descent. Thank you.

Harry Belfonte on Steve McQueen
Jan 12, 2014